Greener On Our Side

Bowling is a Great Activity for 'Spare' Time

Once upon a time, bowling was one of the most popular sports in the United States. The Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) Tour aired on ABC from 1961 to 1997, claiming a prominent time slot before “Wide World of Sports.” A tournament in February 1980 drew a whopping 22.7 million viewers. In 1983, the PBA outdrew the NCAA men’s basketball semifinals and the third round of The Masters golf tournament.

While bowling isn’t quite as prevalent as it once was, it still draws enormous levels of participation. It’s estimated that 25% of Americans enjoy at least one trip to a bowling alley each year. 

And you don’t have to be a legend like Earl Anthony to enjoy a visit to the lanes. Bowling’s a sport beloved by all ages, from preschoolers to the elderly. Anyone can appreciate the benefits of a leisure activity that provides exercise, socializing, and more. 

BowlingOverhaul.com cites the sport’s slow speed and low physical demands as two of the attributes that make it attractive to seniors. There are many physical benefits including a whole-body workout, strengthened muscles, improved flexibility and balance, and improved hand-eye coordination. Mental benefits include the reduction in stress that comes from socializing with others, including kids. As we’ve written before, participating in intergenerational activities with grandchildren provides many benefits, too.

At GreenFields of Geneva senior living community, residents enjoy Wii bowling, which mimics the actions of real bowling while providing many of the same benefits. Nearby St. Charles Bowl has been in the Fox Valley since 1961, providing regular opportunities for open bowling. >

Bowling provides numerous benefits even if a frame ends in a 7-10 split rather than a strike. A trip to your local bowling alley may be just the low-stress, relaxing outing for those looking to stay active and engaged with friends and family.


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